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Social Web Recap 14.08.17

Social Web Recap 14.08.17

A weekly annotated short summary of significant social web platform developments from the previous week, with links and carping marginalia as needed . . . Posted every Monday morning or thereabouts.

Snapchat

In case there was any doubt about Snapchat's dominance of the teen market, this chart from Statista should put them to rest. Others, however, are simply waiting for Snapchat to die as Instagram Stories wins the hearts of Gen Y and no one wants more ads sucking up the messaging platform air.

Facebook

Facebook has shut down one if its attempts to reach teens who, as the chart above evidences, love Snapchat . Called 'Lifestage' Facebook's video diary app was meant to appeal to video messaging-obsessed teens, but faced a few problems including privacy issues: To sign up you had to be under 21 years old which, of course, was very difficult to administer, so there were lots of lurkers. Of course, the big problem was that teens, well, much prefer Snapchat.

Ready to watch longer videos on your phone? Facebook thinks so. It will soon offer original shows from more than 30 hefty content producers in a new video location called Watch.  "Watch is essentially a remake of Facebook’s video tab, available online and across Facebook’s apps for mobile devices and connected TVs. It will offer a library of longer form and episodic video shows made by publishers, celebrities and digital video creators. Shows on Facebook Watch will fall into two tiers: TV-sized half-hour programs launching on Facebook later this year and shorter “spotlight” series with episodes running between 5 and 15 minutes."

In an effort to clean up metrics reported to advertisers and Page administers, Facebook is removing unintentional clicks from its Audience Network, which can "can dilute the value" of advertising campaigns. (And It will be looking at ways to avoid unintentional clicks on ads altogether). It is also adding two new metrics: 'Gross impressions', which "gives marketers the opportunity to quantify non-billable impressions"; and 'auto-refresh impressions' which show how many impressions on a right-hand side ad are a result of a browser refresh rather than actual views.

Instagram

Instagram is testing new functionality for its live video feature that will allow users to add a friend on a live broadcast  to "hang out and go live together, whether you’re just doing homework or catching up on your day." Fun maybe; but not ground breaking.  

YouTube

Until last week, if you wanted to share a YouTube video you had to copy and paste a link into an email or a social or messaging app. The video sharing site now has a new tab on its mobile app that will let you"share videos with your friends and family directly on YouTube. Not only can you share and receive videos in the app, you can also chat about them right on YouTube, reply with another video, invite others to the conversation, and more."

So-called video 'creators' are unhappy with YouTube over some changes it has been making to the ways it assesses who can make money from advertising in their videos. YouTube's guidelines include having to have at least 10,000 total channel views and posting content free of "hateful or incendiary content".  However, according to The Verge it has announce "a way for creators to understand which videos have been flagged as inappropriate for all advertisers and a way to appeal what they see as unjust advertising bans." And YouTube adds "new icons that will give (creators) a more detailed understanding of how each and every video on your channel (or channels) is monetizing as well as the ability to appeal if you think a video is misclassified."

Social Web Recap 21.08.17

Social Web Recap 21.08.17

Social Web Recap 07.08.17

Social Web Recap 07.08.17